Art of the Japanese Garden

When you study the history and style of the Japanese strolling garden and Asian gardens in general, you learn about the concept of the framing of pictures or views. That is, as you walk thru the garden, each new area should form a new view to delight. This idea leads to an immersive experience as we stroll, where we are transported into a unique culture and even into the history of that culture. I use this concept to measure the success of Yordie’s Zen Garden, and a couple days ago I took a stroll looking for new views and to reexamine how well I’ve done with recent changes.

The torii gate is always a good place to start,
it should be a welcoming entrance and immediately express where you are.
This is a view of the gardener’s cart,
invoking the idea that there is much work to do in a garden
A view of the trail that leads to the bridge
that crosses The Meandering Pond
Oh how I love the mystery of the bamboo forest.
Recently I added another box of 50 bamboo trees to help fill it out even more
 A view of the west side of the Pond,
in the distance the Harvest Moon Cafe
A new feature, the Little Pond of Yordie’s Happiness (hehe, what can I say).

The hours I’ve invested into the garden with recent changes are probably not even noticeable to the casual visitor here. The point of the changes is to continue the work to achieve a type of perfection, a perfection I can’t even explain. Or maybe it’s just me playing. I can’t say for certain.

If you are interested in learning more about Japanese gardens, ask me for the cultural paper I wrote when I was an apprentice geisha at Yoshiwara Okiya.

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About Yordie

I'm an avatar in Second Life where I star as the heroine of a virtual fantasy life. In the real world, I'm writing my debut sci-fi novel.
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